Fight for $15 and minimum wage myth-busting in Polk County, Iowa

McDonald workers in the first strike by fast food workers in Iowa’s history, Jan. 28, 2016.

McDonald workers in the first strike by fast food workers in Iowa’s history, Jan. 28, 2016.

Des Moines, Iowa — Over 70 community members gathered in Polk County, Iowa, on June 28 to hear speakers Paul Iversen from the University of Iowa Labor Center and Peter Fisher of the Iowa Policy Project “myth-bust” common lies against raising the minimum wage.

The event was hosted by Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, which launched their Fight for $15 campaign in April 2015 during a national day of action that spread through 226 U.S. cities coast-to-coast.

In January 2016, Iowa CCI helped organize the first strike of fast food workers in state history. According to Iowa CCI organizer Emily Schott, two things are clear: “$15 an hour is what it takes to make ends meet in Polk County, and job loss as a result of a higher minimum wage is a myth.”

Peter Fisher backs this up: “Most families in Polk County need to earn more than $15 per hour just to pay for basic needs.” Iowa’s minimum wage of $7.25 has remained stagnant since 2008, and since then the cost of living has “grown exponentially.” (iowapolicyproject.org)
Workers are encouraged to continue the fight by attending the Minimum Wage Task Force meeting at the Polk County Administration Building, Room 120, on July 14 at 2:30 pm.

(Photo: Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement)

(Photo: Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement)